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Femoral shaft waist distribution and its relationship to mobility levels and other size/shape measures in three temporally distinct populations

Citace: [] FRIEDL, L., HOLLIDAY, T. . W., SLÁDEK, V. Femoral shaft waist distribution and its relationship to mobility levels and other size/shape measures in three temporally distinct populations. 2010.
Druh: PŘEDNÁŠKA, POSTER
Jazyk publikace: eng
Anglický název: Femoral shaft waist distribution and its relationship to mobility levels and other size/shape measures in three temporally distinct populations
Rok vydání: 2010
Autoři: Mgr. Lukáš Friedl , Trenton W. Holliday Ph.D. , Mgr. Vladimír Sládek Ph.D.
Abstrakt CZ: Previously, we developed the concept of the femoral shaft waist (Friedl et al. 2009). We believe that such a measure has biomechanical importance since it reflects the place with the lowest adaptive strengthening of the shaft against overall bending and torsional stresses. Here, we explore its distribution in three temporally and behaviorally distinct samples to assess whether mobility levels influence its location. We also explore its relationship to other body size/shape measures for possible prediction. Prehistoric (n=45), historic (n=72), and recent human samples (n=53) were used. External A-P and M-L diameters were measured on femora from 65% to 35% BML in 1% steps. Polar moment of area (J) was estimated following Pearson et al. (2006) and location of minimum J was recorded. Results show that femoral shaft waist distribution is skewed distally in prehistoric and historic samples with the majority of observations between 65 and 60 %BML. This holds true for prehistoric males and females but only for historic males. Historic females and the recent human sample show a normal distribution (P=0.33, resp. P=0.35) around midshaft. This may suggest that with decreasing mobility over time, the femoral shaft waist shifts distally. RMA regression analyses revealed non-significant relationships between minimum J position and other size/shape measures. However, we did find a significant positive relationship between minimum J and minimum M-L diameter (r=0.63, 0.59, 0.68), suggesting that A-P diameter may change more easily according to behavior, while M-L diameter better reflects shaft structural properties.
Abstrakt EN: Previously, we developed the concept of the femoral shaft waist (Friedl et al. 2009). We believe that such a measure has biomechanical importance since it reflects the place with the lowest adaptive strengthening of the shaft against overall bending and torsional stresses. Here, we explore its distribution in three temporally and behaviorally distinct samples to assess whether mobility levels influence its location. We also explore its relationship to other body size/shape measures for possible prediction. Prehistoric (n=45), historic (n=72), and recent human samples (n=53) were used. External A-P and M-L diameters were measured on femora from 65% to 35% BML in 1% steps. Polar moment of area (J) was estimated following Pearson et al. (2006) and location of minimum J was recorded. Results show that femoral shaft waist distribution is skewed distally in prehistoric and historic samples with the majority of observations between 65 and 60 %BML. This holds true for prehistoric males and females but only for historic males. Historic females and the recent human sample show a normal distribution (P=0.33, resp. P=0.35) around midshaft. This may suggest that with decreasing mobility over time, the femoral shaft waist shifts distally. RMA regression analyses revealed non-significant relationships between minimum J position and other size/shape measures. However, we did find a significant positive relationship between minimum J and minimum M-L diameter (r=0.63, 0.59, 0.68), suggesting that A-P diameter may change more easily according to behavior, while M-L diameter better reflects shaft structural properties.
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